If we are brave enough often enough we will fall

If we are brave enough often enough we will fall.  (Brene Brown)

Most of us, when we get beyond our infant years, have some fear of falling.

(And as I was typing this I mis-typed falling and wrote failing instead.  And fear of falling and fear of failing are not so different when you think about it.)

If we never reach out beyond what is comfortable, we cannot challenge ourselves and taste the fruit right at the end of the branch.  We won’t test ourselves to see if doing this particular something, or going to that particular place might be as joyful as we imagine it to be. 

When we stick with what we’ve always known, we get what we’ve always known.

That’s one of the riches to enjoy going to a Yoga class where the teacher invites us to try a new posture, or extend a little further in a familiar posture.

It doesn’t always work. 

We might wobble in Vrksasana – the Tree Pose.

We might need the support of a chair in Ardha Chandrasana – the Half-Moon Pose. 

And even when we have support we might shake and fall.

We might fall forwards in Bakasana – the Crane Pose.  

We might find that some poses that seemed impossible a month or so ago, are almost within sight today.

Or they might not.

It’s helpful to remind ourselves that Hatha Yoga practice is that – a practice. 

We are not aiming to ‘achieve’ anything.  It’s actually the side effects that are the most beneficial:

  • When we practise something, anything, regularly, you get used to noticing that some days things come more easily than others, and that’s okay.
  • We find that we can make time in a busy week for something that nourishes us.
  • We learn to trust ourselves more: in Yoga practice we learn that our body might not let us down as often as we might have once thought, and this can extend into other areas of our lives.
  • We learn that our mood can affect our Yoga; and that Yoga can affect our mood.
  • We find delight in the increased strength in our physical body on an everyday basis.
  • We get to know our bodies better, and become aware of changes in it sooner.
  • We might sleep more easily.
  • We might find that we can reduce medication for some health conditions.
  • We learn that comparisons with others are less fruitful than we might once have imagined: in the Yoga class might be people of all ages, body types and personalities, and if we continue to compare our ‘progress’ with another’s we will miss out on the joyful experience that is ours alone in practising the postures – no matter how long we can balance, stretch or hold our breath.

There are so many benefits which can translate directly or indirectly to our everyday lives.  And no, Yoga is not the only one.  But I know of few others that offer such a wide variety of benefits, accessible to anyone, of any age, of any level of health or fitness, of any means, who wants to explore its many aspects and gifts.